THIS ADVISORY EXPIRED ON April 2, 2016 @ 2:59 am
Issued by - Kent May
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Today the avalanche danger will start out LOW in the morning and climb to MODERATE by early afternoon when the thin frozen crust melts. Warm temps and full sunshine will make human triggered wet avalanches possible on slopes over 30 degrees above 6,000 feet on all but the shadiest of aspects. Below 6,000 the danger will remain LOW throughout the day on all but the very steep, saturated slopes. 

How to read the advisory
View North American Danger Scale


Heightened avalanche conditions on specific terrain features. Evaluate snow and terrain carefully; identify features of concern. Natural avalanches unlikely; human-triggered avalanches possible. Small avalanches in specific areas; or large avalanches in isolated areas.

Avalanche Problem 1: Loose Wet
  • Type ?
  • Aspect/Elevation ?
  • Likelihood ?
    likely
    unlikely
  • Size ?
    large
    small
  • Trend ?
    Increasing Danger

The last few days have been warm, and the weekend is going to be even warmer. Be cautious on solar aspects through the day as the snowpack heats up. On any slopes that the sun is shinning, wet snow avalanches will be the primary concern through the weekend. These warm temps will be exacerbated by last nights lows barely dipping below freezing ....barely and not for long. Saturday and Sunday night temps will hover at or above freezing, so even a light freeze may not be in the cards.

With this lack of a hard freeze overnight, be sure to recreate early and/or avoid steep slopes on solar aspects as the daytime temp rises. If we get more than two nights without a hard freeze in the mountains the danger for will rise and cornices should be avoided.

Avalanche Problem 2: Wind Slab
  • Type ?
  • Aspect/Elevation ?
  • Likelihood ?
    likely
    unlikely
  • Size ?
    large
    small
  • Trend ?
    Decreasing Danger

If you are in the highest of elevations in the advisory area, and on west through northeast facing terrain, be on the look out for windslabs. These should be at the end of their lifecycle due to the warm temps and lack of light snow to transport, but some old slabs could be awakened if you find the right spot.

advisory discussion

We will be doing periodic and weekend updates as conditions change.  There is still plenty of winter left in the mountains, but the PAC budget melted out a little early this year. We want to extend a BIG thank you to the Friends of the Payette Avalanche Center Board of Directors for their financial support as well as to all of our volunteer travel companions that join us in ALL kinds of weather and conditions. Want to help us help you? Join FPAC as a member or come be on the Board of Directors and help steer the future of the Payette Avalanche Center!

Pay attention to rapidly changing spring conditions while you are out in the mountains and if you see or trigger avalanche activity, please take the time to get in touch with us. Remember your information can save lives. If you see anything we should know about, let us know by clicking the OBSERVATION tab at the top of the page. Or by calling/emailing directly 208-634-0419 or forecast@payetteavalanche.org.  If you are getting out and enjoying any spring skiing/riding we would like to know, any information is good information!  

recent observations

Yesterday temps reached 50 degees at 7,500 feet. Loose wet avalanches have been seen and reported on all but the shadiest of slopes. An east wind on Tuesday formed new slabs on west facing aspects, which is not the norm for our area. 

CURRENT CONDITIONS  Today's Weather Observations From the Granite Weather Station at 7700 ft.:
0600 temperature: deg. F.
Max. temperature in the last 24 hours: deg. F.
Average wind direction during the last 24 hours:
Average wind speed during the last 24 hours: mph
Maximum wind gust in the last 24 hours: mph
New snowfall in the last 24 hours: inches
Total snow depth: inches
weather

Another warm spring day is on tap today. Temps will reach 50 degrees at 7,500 feet and winds will be light out of the southwest. A slight disturbance will bring clouds and a slight chance of showers on Saturday night. Doesn't look like we will see freezing temps in the mountains on Saturday or Sunday night.

Two-Day Mountain Weather Forecast  Produced in partnership with the NOAA-NWS
McCall Airport at 5021 feet.
  Friday Friday Night Saturday
Weather: Sunny, with a high near 54. Calm wind becoming west northwest around 5 mph. Mostly clear, with a low around 31. Light and variable wind. Sunny, with a high near 58. Calm wind becoming south southwest around 6 mph in the afternoon.
Temperatures: High 54 deg. F. Low 31 deg. F. High 58 deg. F.
Wind direction: west-northwest variable south-southwest
Wind speed: calm-light light calm-light
Expected snowfall: 0 in. 0 in. 0 in.
Granite Mountain at 7700 feet.
  Friday Friday Night Saturday
Weather: Sunny, with a high near 50. North wind 5 to 7 mph becoming calm in the morning. Mostly clear, with a low around 31. Southwest wind 3 to 7 mph. Sunny, with a high near 48. Southwest wind 7 to 9 mph.
Temperatures: High 50 deg. F. Low 31 deg. F. High 48 deg. F.
Wind direction: north Southwest Southwest
Wind speed: calm-light light light
Expected snowfall: 0 in. 0 in. 0 in.
Disclaimer

This avalanche advisory is provided through a partnership between the Payette National Forest and the Payette Avalanche Center. This advisory covers the West Central Mountains between Hard Butte on the north and Council Mountain on the south. This advisory applies only to backcountry areas outside established ski area boundaries. This advisory describes general avalanche conditions and local variations always occur. This advisory expires at midnight on the posted day unless otherwise noted. The information in this advisory is provided by the USDA Forest Service who is solely responsible for its content.

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